Do You Bark Your Truth?

truth-abe_lincoln-word_cloudThere’s a quote in the book Bad Dog! by Lin Jensen that I try to come back to when I feel I’ve lost direction and an inner compass, “If we are true to the steps we take, the travel makes sense and the journey confirms itself.”   In essence, if we are putting one proverbial foot in front of the other from a place of integrity, the journey unfolds before us and becomes less of an effort born of suffering.

So often, we are just “going through the motions” with little recognition of what got us to the present state or why we’re continuing on a given path.

Let’s go back to the dog theme.  Have you ever known a dog to lie or put on a facade? No.  Dogs are brutally honest in their demeanor and actions.  Hungry? Eat.  Happy?  Wag tail.  Threatened?  Bite.  Nowhere does the dog engage in the inner struggle of what they should do vs. what they want or need to do.

Now, I’m not suggesting that you live selfishly without regard to how your actions impact others, but if you start to trust your gut and become aware of your truth at the core,  your perceptions shifts which may even change your path.  In either case, the struggle and suffering begin to wane. Continue reading

On Yoga, Really: Who’s Your Yama? (Part 1 of 3)

With all of the controversy and distortion about yoga in the media lately, I thought I’d take us back to the basics — before ridiculous sex scandals and unfounded sensationalized books — to patanjaliexamine the foundational text of Raja Yoga, The Yoga Sūtras.  Raja yoga which includes asana (poses),  focuses on transcending the mind through meditation.  in fact, Patanjali refers to yoga as “the settling of mind into silence.”  P.S. asana helps set the body up for meditation.

While Patañjali was not the first to write about yoga, his sutras have become an authority text along with the Bhagavad Gita and Upanishads (which make up the sanskrit Hindu epic, the Mahabharata).  The yoga sutras are aphorisms that outline the art, science, and practice of yoga and meditation.  Yoga means union or join — the uniting our ourselves that isn’t actually separate — and sutra means thread.

The yoga sutras are referred to as the eight limbs or eight fold path of yoga because the path is not necessarily sequential as one can be practicing many concurrently.  The first limb of yoga are the yamas, or laws of life (sometimes referred to as restraints).  They can be thought of as the universal moral code for living.  Continue reading